C.G. Jung Society 2006 Lecture/Workshop CDs

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Jacqueline Wright - Love as an Agent of Change

$14.00

LECTURE: For our relationships to flourish, we need to see them in a new way, as a path that leads beyond personal gratification to a realization of our greater potential and connection to the larger energies of life. When we can see the larger purpose for our struggles for deeper intimacy and a fuller relatedness, then working with the challenges of relationships becomes part of an ongoing adventure, an unfolding process of discovery and revelation. And relationship is then lived consciously and intentionally. In this lecture we explore the rich alchemical imagery found in the myth of Eros and Psyche, which gives us a larger picture of what the journey of conscious relationship may entail. Taking care to honor the complex alchemical traditions, we briefly explore the stages of the alchemical path and the parallel processes found in our everyday lives and relationships.

Jacqueline Wright, Ed.D. is a Jungian analyst in private practice in Atlanta, offering analysis and psychotherapy to individuals and couples. A graduate of the Jung Institute in Zurich, she is a past president and founding member of the Georgia Association of Jungian Analysts and a training analyst in the Inter-Regional Society for Jungian Analysts. She is particularly interested in matters of the heart - in exploring issues of love, intimacy and relationships.

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Pete Williams - Intelligent Design? What would Jung Say?

$14.00

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LECTURE: Recently, we have witnessed such phenomenon in the context of The DaVinci Code, the Terri Schiavo story, the frenzy and panic surrounding Y2K, the storms that form around genetic science and, the ongoing debate regarding the authorship and origins of the human species. As Jungians, whenever we encounter an aberration in the conscious attitude, we begin to suspect that the unconscious is at work attempting to make some correction or to add or reveal something that is missing. In this lecture, we bracket aside our political, religious or philosophical responses to the evolution/intelligent design debate in an attempt to gain some insight into the pysche’s perspective on the question. My hope is that we can all become curious psychological detectives as we wonder together why this old debate is resurfacing with such energy behind it. We need to ask; why this question, why now, and what might be the psychological meaning of it all?

Pete Williams, Ph.D., is a licensed psychotherapist in private practice in Atlanta. He obtained his doctorate in Depth Psychology from Pacifica Graduate Institute and is currently in training to become an analyst with the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts.

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Dennis Patrick Slattery - On Pilgrimage as Archetypal Journey

$14.00

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LECTURE: Consciousness may bring with it a corresponding impulse to leave the familiar confines of family, neighborhood and routine in order to journey down unfamiliar paths, and even to enter the thick part of the woods where no one has yet trod. The pilgrim, not the tourist, satisfies this impulse. Pilgrimage is a quest to satisfy some appetite in the soul that possessions, success, family and friends, cannot assuage. Its journey is two fold—out to the world and into the deeper forest of one's interior terrain. Pilgrimage uncovers the motifs of one's personal myth at the same time that it desires to be expressed in writing, art or dance.

Dennis Patrick Slattery, Ph.D. , is Core Faculty, Mythological Studies and Depth Psychology Programs at Pacifica Graduate Institute. He holds an MA in Comparative Literature from Kent State University, an MA and Ph.D. in Literature and Phenomenology from the University of Dallas. He has authored over 250 articles as well as written or edited 8 books, the most recent of which include Grace in the Desert: Awakening to the Gifts of Monastic Life and Just Below the Water Line: Selected Poems.

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Lyn Cowan - Many are Called, But How to Answer?

$24.00

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WORKSHOP: The word "vocation" means "a calling," experienced as an inner voice that prompts us to follow a certain path in life. It brings a sense of Destiny, of purposefulness -- not merely blind Fate. Jung's theory of individuation suggests that we are "called" to become distinct personalities, to become conscious of ourselves and our differences, both interpersonal and intrapersonal. But how do we "hear" this call? And if we hear it, how can we answer in a world pressing more insistently for conformity for safety's sake? What sort of heroism and personal responsibility is required for us to hear and answer psyche's call?

Lyn Cowan, Ph.D. , has been a practicing Jungian analyst since 1980, Director of Training for the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts for six years and past president of the Society, held a Professorship for ten years in the doctoral program in Clinical Psychology at Argosy University (Minneapolis). She is the author of three books: Portrait of the Blue Lady: The Character of Melancholy; Tracking the White Rabbit: A Subversive View of Modern Culture; and Masochism: A Jungian View.

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Lyn Cowan - Seabiscuit: The Little Horse That Could, And Did, And Still Does

$14.00

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LECTURE: The mythic Hero is larger than life, and must accomplish impossible tasks at great risk, bringing hope and redemption to lesser mortals. But the Hero stands in an important relationship to the Self, and implied in the Hero's grand mission are ideas of personal responsibility and vocation. This presentation will invite a conversation about the collective psychological phenomenon that appeared in the form of a horse named Seabiscuit, a true mythic Hero, and the human partners who engaged with him in a mutual process of transformation.

Lyn Cowan, Ph.D. , has been a practicing Jungian analyst since 1980, Director of Training for the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts for six years and past president of the Society, held a Professorship for ten years in the doctoral program in Clinical Psychology at Argosy University (Minneapolis). She is the author of three books: Portrait of the Blue Lady: The Character of Melancholy; Tracking the White Rabbit: A Subversive View of Modern Culture; and Masochism: A Jungian View.

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Robert Romanyshyn - Love, Grief & Mourning

$14.00

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LECTURE: The inability to mourn and the necessity to do so are the problems of our time. Following Jung’s approach to the psyche, this talk shows how an imaginal view of the mourning process is a work of transformation that serves the task of individuation. The myth of Orpheus and his beloved Eurydice serves as the container for the themes of this talk. Orpheus is the lover/poet who travels between worlds. As a mythic presence Orpheus is an archetypal figure who bridges the gap between daylight and darkness. In mourning we are guided by Orpheus in the dark light of soul on our journeys of homecoming.

Robert Romanyshyn is a Senior Core Faculty Member at Pacifica Graduate Institute in Santa Barbara, California and the first non-analyst to be elected as an Affiliate Member of The Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts for his contributions to Jungian studies. He is the author of numerous articles and chapters in edited volumes and has published six books. His book The Wounded Researcher is scheduled for publication in 2007.

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